Benton Stone

Male 1907 - 1981


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  • Born  31 Jan 1907  Loudoun County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  30 Nov 1981  Falls Church, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Mount Olivet United Methodist Church Cemetery, Lovettsville, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I15  Virts
    Last Modified  8 Aug 2015 

    Father  Living 
    Mother  Ella Mae Stone,   b. 2 Aug 1879, Lovettsville, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 27 Jun 1953, Leesburg, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F25486  Group Sheet

    Family  Goldie Pauline Virts,   b. 20 Oct 1907, Lovettsville, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Feb 1997, Leesburg, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  24 Oct 1934  Leesburg, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Last Modified  5 Aug 2015 
    Family ID  F4  Group Sheet

  • Photos

    » Slide Show
    Goldie Pauline Virts and Benton Stone
    Goldie Pauline Virts and Benton Stone
    Goldie was born October 20, 1907 in Lovettsville, Virginia to Oscar Franklin and Mary Catherine Mann Virts. She died on February 13, 1997 in Leesburg, Virginia. She married Benton Stone on October 28, 1934. Benton was born January 31, 1907 in Loudoun County, Virginia and died November 30, 1981 in Fairfax, Virginia. Both are buried in the Cemetery at Mt. Olivet Methodist Church in Lovettsville.

    Photo Courtesy of Raymond E. Virts Family
    A Virts Country Butchering
    A Virts Country Butchering
    Th hog has been scrapped clean and shaved down with a knife and ready to be hung on the gallous pole. In the foreground are Benton Stone and Theodore Roosevelt Virts, with Russell James Virts working on the hog. Behind Russell is Elmer Swartz.
    A Virts Country Butchering
    A Virts Country Butchering
    Raymond Eugene Virts, left, and Benton Stone de-bone and cut up the heads. This meat will be cooked in the kettles and later ground up and will be put in the ponhaus (scrapple) and poudin.
    A Virts Country Butchering
    A Virts Country Butchering
    The hog has been cut up, with an untrimmed ham (foreground right). The ham, some weighing as much as 40 pounds, will eventually be sugar cured along with the sides (bacon) and shoulders. The backbone and ribs will be put into a salt-water brine in large 10-20 gallon crocks. Pork chops were not part cut from the hog, since the whole tenderloin was kept, sliced and frozen. Scrap pieces will be put into the sausage. In this picture are (left, front to back), Benton Stone, James Speaks and Clarence Lanham. On the right are James Green and Elmer Swartz.
    A Virts Country Butchering
    A Virts Country Butchering
    Elmer Swartz stirring the Poudin, Raymond Eugene Virts, Lester William Thomas Virts, Clarence Lanham, Benton Stone stirring Ponhaus (scrapple) and Daniel Fleming.



    Headstones
    Goldie Pauline Virts (1907-1997) and Benton Stone (1907-1981) Headstone
    Goldie Pauline Virts (1907-1997) and Benton Stone (1907-1981) Headstone

    Albums
    A Virts Country Butchering
    A Virts Country Butchering (14)
    November was the time for butchering hogs. It has been a fall tradition in the Virts family for well over 100 years. The Raymond E. Virts family on the Long Lane in Lovettsville, Virginia always butchered on Thanksgiving day. You might consider the butchering day as a family reunion held several times each November as this even would bring together siblings, cousins and friends. There was always a friendly competition amongst Raymond's brothers to see who had the largest hog. It was not uncommon to have a hog have a dressed weight of over 400 pounds. Such a hog would produce over 40 pound hams that would be sugar cured. Most local families had a butchering and would usually slaughter form 2 - 14 hogs, depending on the size of the family. Butchering is nearly extinct today. You will only find a hand full of families that still carry on the tradition. Hardly anyone even knows how to do it anymore. I would have to say it is a dying art. Just click on the picture to see it enlarged and to get a description.

  • Notes 
    • Loudoun Times Mirror, December 1981

      Benton Stone, 74, of Waterford, a Loudoun native, died Nov. 30 at Fairfax Hospital. Born Jan. 31, 1907 in Loudoun, Mr. Stone had attended the old Brookland School near Morrisonville. He is survived by his wife Goldie Pauline Stone; a step-daughter, Lureen Laing of Wilmington, Del.; two half-sisters, Helen Wright of Purcellville and Madge Reynolds of Silver Spring, Md.; eight step-grandchildren and eight step-great-grandchildren. Interment was in the Mt. Olivet Methodist Cemetery, Lovettsville.

  • Sources 
    1. [S572] Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940.